Cat Care

What’s next for you and your new cat?

1. Choosing a Veterinarian

Most cats adopted will require at least one visit to your veterinarian within the next three weeks to update vaccines as we do not vaccinate for rabies. Some cats may need multiple visits (kittens for instance). You will receive a complete medical history for your adopted cat to give to your veterinarian. We recommend that all pets adopted visit a vet within three weeks of adoption. The following are procedures that may be needed or could be recommended by your veterinarian:

  • Booster vaccinations including rabies
  • Flea prevention
  • Fecal analysis, deworming
  • Wellness testing (blood work)
  • Urinalysis

PLEASE REMEMBER THAT IF THERE IS A MEDICAL PROBLEM WITHIN THE FIRST 48 HOURS OF GOING HOME ****CALL US IMMEDIATELY**** AND WE WILL ADVISE YOU WHAT TO DO FROM THERE (519.966.5751).

2. Adjustment

  • We recommend when first arriving home placing the cat (while still in its carrier) in the room where the litter box will be kept.
  • Allow the cat to exit its carrier on its own. They are likely frightened, especially adult cats. Leave the cat to explore this room and become accustomed to the location of its litter box. **It is not recommended to keep litter boxes close to laundry facilities or in noisy areas of the home; this may deter the cat/kitten from using it.
  • Remember most of our cat/kittens have been in cages for at least one week and may have “sensory overload” when in a new home, it is best to slowly open up areas of the home for the cat/kitten to explore.
  • It is important to let the new cat/kitten adjust to its new environment slowly and it may take days (even weeks) for them to feel completely comfortable.
  • Declawing cats should not be done without careful deliberation and after all other options to deal with inappropriate scratching have been exhausted. For information on effective and humane alternatives to declawing, click here.

3. Some Behaviour Tips for New Kitten Owners

ADDING A NEW KITTEN OR CAT TO YOUR LIFE IS AS EASY AS 1 – 2 – 3

  • Introducing your new cat or kitten to the litter box several times for the first day or two should greatly reduce any inappropriate elimination or accidents. Never use ammonia to clean up accidents; it will attract your new pet back because of the natural ammonia in its urine. Use an odour neutralizer with a stain remover. You can make your own odour neutralizer with a 50/50 mixture of white vinegar and water (be sure to check carpets for colour-fastness first). Strong smells may stop your cat from using the litter box. Clean with soap and water and rinse well.
  • Keeping your pet’s nails trimmed and a scratching post or board available will help to avoid any inappropriate scratching of furniture. To help attract your pet to the scratching post or board, you can sprinkle catnip on or around the post. A water bottle squirt will stop inappropriate scratching.
  • Toys, such as balls with bells inside and well sewn catnip toys are important for entertainment as well as exercise. Check the toys periodically for loose threads or parts that could become choking hazards. Never give your cat or kitten thread or string to play with as it could cause serious internal injuries if swallowed.
  • REMEMBER to keep all medications and cleaning products in a cabinet or closet out of reach of your kitten or cat. If you have plants around your house or apartment, ask your veterinarian if any of them could be toxic or poisonous if chewed or swallowed.

4. Do Indoor Cats Miss Out on the Action? You bet!

Here is a partial list of what your cat misses by staying indoors:

  • Fights with other cats
  • Attacks by free-roaming dogs and raccoons
  • Infections from puncture wounds
  • Fleas, ticks and worms
  • Poisoning (pesticides, herbicides, antifreeze, etc.)
  • Exposure to Feline Immunodeficiency Virus
  • Exposure to Feline Leukemia
  • Being stolen
  • Being hit by a car
  • Getting lost
  • Getting caught in a steel-jaw trap
  • Encountering sick or rabid skunks or raccoons
  • Getting caught in an auto fan belt

In addition to being bad for pet cats, even well-fed cats who are allowed outdoors will prey on birds.  Keeping your cat indoors not only helps them, but other wildlife too!  Learn more at www.catsandbirds.ca.  We’re a proud supporter of their efforts to keep pet cats safely indoors.

Still think your cat would be happier outdoors? Read this click here.

PET INSURANCE

We have provided you with pet insurance through PetHealth for select medical issues that may arise after the first 48 hours. If you experience a medical problem after the first 48 hours you are to attend a veterinarian of choice to assess the issue. You will be responsible for any payment. If the issue is covered by Pet Insurance you can submit a claim to them with your receipt and they will assess the claim.  Please note that the listed conditions include primarily accidents and infectious illnesses.  If your pet becomes ill shortly after adoption please review your adoption contract for additional information and directions.

PLEASE NOTE THERE IS A $75 DEDUCTIBLE FOR ALL PET INSURANCE CLAIMS AND THAT THE HUMANE SOCIETY PLAYS NO PART IN ACCEPTING OR DENYING CLAIMS.

AS WELL, EVEN THOUGH OUR ANIMALS ARE EXAMINED BY A VETERINARIAN WE CAN, UNFORTUNATELY, NEVER GUARANTEE THEIR HEALTH. MOST DISEASES ARE UNDETECABLE UNTIL CLINICAL SIGNS ARE NOTICED.